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Jewish Community Center of Greater Pittsburgh has groovy 60s party

We're all for any party that has a cocktail table filled with glasses of electric orange-colored Tang awaiting us upon arrival. On Saturday, the Jewish Community Center of Greater Pittsburgh went 60s during Big Night: Peace, Love and the IKC 's (nickname for the Irene Kaufmann Center, the predecessor to the JCC), where a whopping 900-plus opted to take advantage of the "Groovy Garb" dress code.

"He took longer to get ready than I did ... I told him it's either the fringed vest or this!" laughed Erin Burger , of her Don Draper-fied husband, Matt .

Cans of Tab making the rounds, the hippies shared the love with the go-go dancers and beatniks, although a center stage performance by Beatles Tribute Band, The Get Back Band Band, unleashed the inner wild childs of more than a few while members, of the prim and proper looked cautiously on.

Elsewhere, JCC prez Brian Schreiber stopped to pay homage to honoree John Wolf Sr. and Lee Wolf , who were busy being greeted by a flurry of fans we heard were going to be letting the sunshine in later on that evening with a late-night, Woodstock-style concert featuring Rusted Root.

Knee-high boots, minis, tie-dyes and bell bottoms as far as the eye could see, co-chairs Ina and Larry Gumberg and Cheryl Gerson and Bruce Americus took a minute to fill us in on how they managed to assemble their vintage ensembles.

"Forty-five years ago, my mother wore this dress to a Ladies Hospital Aid Society event," mused Cheryl. "Can you imagine?"

Photo Galleries

Getting to the Point

Getting to the Point

Getting to the Point Luncheon at the Mansions on Fifth on Tuesday, March 1, 2011.

Peace, Love and the IKC

Peace, Love and the IKC

Peace, Love and the IKCs at the JCC in Squirrel Hill Saturday, March 5, 2011. (Jasmine Goldband | Tribune-Review)

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