Share This Page

Hitchcock-theme gives Peep crown back to Green Tree resident

Nancy Becker is a re-peep winner in the Trib's Peeps Show contest.

Becker, of Green Tree, bested nearly 200 entries with "The Peeps," a movie poster parody of Alfred Hitchcock's nature revenge film "The Birds."

Becker won last year with another Hitchcock-themed entry, "Return to the S'mores Motel -- Anthony Peepkins strikes again!", a take-off on the movie "Psycho."

"I'm kind of on a Hitchcock roll," she says. "I really like Alfred Hitchcock."

Contestants had to assemble a diorama that re-enacted a scene from history, a movie, advertising or pop culture -- with marshmallow Peeps standing in for the characters or real-life people. This year's contest inspired works like, "I'm Sticky and I Know It," "Jurassic Peeps," "Peep Hoarder, Buried Alive" and "Aurora Bunnyalis."

Becker created her sinister scene by putting Peeps on wooden skewers and placing them in a terrarium. She printed out a background from the movie, photographed it and put it into her computer, where she used Photoshop software to add the movie poster and flying Peeps in the sky.

On the lighter side, Holly Kapral of Mount Bethel earned runner-up honors for "MallowBob Peeppants," She used a hot-glue gun to assemble an underwater tableau that parodied SpongeBob SquarePants and his buddies Patrick the Starfish and Squidward Tentacles.

"It took me a couple weeks, because I didn't work on it all the time," says Kapral, who works as a graphic designer. "It probably took me a good two to three weeks, a couple hours here and there.

"I've never done one before, but I love Peeps. I eat 'em all the time."

Instead of popular culture, runner-up Tiffany Nicastro of Lower Burrell drew inspiration from the old masters. She set her entry in an art gallery, where cultured Peeps clustered around "The Scream" and "The Mona Lisa," both re-imagined with Peep faces.

"I printed out 'The Scream' and 'The Mona Lisa.' I cut the face out with scissors and stuck the Peeps in from behind."

The title "You Said to Create A Masterpiece" was a literal response to one of the challenges put forth by contest officials.

"I like to do a lot of crafty things," says Nicastro, who teaches English at Gateway Middle School. " I'm a fan of the museums and galleries. I take my kids. We saw some of the real paintings when we were in Italy about five years ago."

As the grand-prize winner, Becker will receive a $100 gift card and an assortment of Peeps products and accessories. The two runners-up each will receive a $50 gift card.

Photo Galleries

2012 Peeps Show Contest

2012 Peeps Show Contest

The entries so far in this year's contest.

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.