Share This Page

Discovery workshops offer Hampton educator high-tech collaboration

Erin Prosser knows the way to a child's mind is through a computer. A librarian and media specialist in the Hampton School District, Prosser uses technology to make topics relevant to elementary school students.

"My students come to school with the knowledge of computers in their daily life," said Prosser, 35, of Plum. "It's my job to help them use technology to succeed in life."

Prosser has traveled across the country each of the past three years to take part in the Discovery Education Network Summer Institute. Hosted by Discovery Education -- the group behind the Discovery Channel and Animal Planet -- the six-day program shows teachers different techniques and resources they can use in their classrooms.

This year, four Western Pennsylvania teachers were among nearly 80 from across the country to attend the workshop in Silver Spring, Md. Joining Prosser were Linda Michael, an elementary technology coach in the Connellsville Area School District; Jan Abernethy, a fifth-grade teacher in the Greenville Area School District; and Traci Blazosky, a first-grade teacher in the Clarion Area School District.

"It's rewarding just getting to network with other educators from across the country," said Michael, of Connellsville. "I'm hoping to collaborate with other teachers, including one I met from Canada. Hopefully, we can work on some projects together."

In addition to the networking opportunity, teachers participated in workshops. One, for instance, taught teachers how to combine music and images to have students make music videos. Other workshops focused on visual storytelling, which lets students use flip cameras -- an inexpensive video camera -- to create movies to tell their stories.

"Anything involving technology, these kids just eat up," Prosser said. "It's great for them to use technology to be creative and use their critical thinking skills."

Michael said she'll continue to use the writing prompts, quizzes and other technological tools she learns at the workshops in her third, fourth and fifth-grade classes.

"Kids learn so well with digital media," Michael said. "When I went to school, we didn't have computers like they do. Now as teachers, we need to keep up with those skills and make learning fun."

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.