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Congressman tours Uniontown firm Paramedic Technology Corporation

Congressman Mark Critz visited Uniontown Thursday and toured Paramedic Technology Corporation, a software company.

PTC has been helping manufacturers succeed by meeting their globalization, time-to-market, operational efficiency objectives in product development and basically helping entities customize software since 1985. The company has been in Uniontown since March 2006.

Since locating in Uniontown, the number of PTC employees at the Uniontown office grew from 12 to 56 with emphasis on hiring from local colleges and universities because of the area's work ethic. The company has also grown 20 percent in six months and 33 percent in 12 months. It plans to add 10 new employees every year for the next few years.

Of the employees at the Uniontown office, 75 percent have backgrounds in computer science and 25 percent of the employees take care of technical sales, project management and other areas of concentration.

Chuck Cash of the PTC's Federal Business Development Group, said PTC has key accounts with the Army, Navy and Air Force, all of which 65 percent of the Uniontown employees have executed in the past year.

Aaron D. Tuomi, general manager for the Uniontown office and a California University of Pennsylvania alumni, explained that along with recruiting from the local college, the company also has a higher education alignment program that includes career services alignment and free software in schools.

"I'm proud of the work you folks are doing because you're doing it right here," said Critz, who has roots in Uniontown. "That's exciting for me."

Since Critz won a special election to fill the seat of his late boss Congressman John Murtha, he has continued in Murtha's tracks by serving on the House Armed Services Committee.

Critz told the employees of PTC that he and other members of the committee will be reviewing the projects that PTC will work on.

Critz added that while Murtha was criticized for putting money into contracts and companies, what he saw at PTC showed him that there's a return in that investment.

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