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East Franklin couple waives extradition in kidnapping case

An East Franklin man and woman waived their right to have an extradition hearing Friday morning and could be picked up by Virginia authorities next week.

Edward Lee Bracken, 35, and Regina Lynn Powell, 29, both of 20 Lindenwood Drive, appeared in court yesterday on a charge out of Floyd County, Va. in connection with the disappearance of a 15-year-old female.

Judge Kenneth Valasek informed the defendants of their rights and said they could be transported south sometime next week. Bracken and Powell both face a charge of computer solicitation of a child 15 years of age with the accused being seven years or more older for purposes of sexual sodomy, according to a warrant issued by Virginia authorities earlier this week.

The pair is being held in the Armstrong County Jail on $100,000 bail each for alleged crimes that occurred in Armstrong County. They both face charges of concealment of the whereabouts of a child and unlawful contact with a minor.

District Attorney Scott Andreassi said the local charges will be dismissed, allowing Virginia authorities to handle the entire case.

According to court documents, state police responded to the Lindenwood Drive residence on the night of June 17 with a caseworker from Children, Youth and Family Services and found the 15-year-old girl. She told police that she met Bracken and Powell on the Internet several months ago.

On June 15, Bracken called the girl and picked her up at her house, according to court documents. The three stayed at a camp site in Virginia that night and then drove to East Franklin after the girl said she did not want to go home, police said.

State police said the couple sexually assaulted the girl. According to court documents, the defendants told police that they talked to the girl online about having sex and went to Virginia for that purpose.

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