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Events to honor Holocaust Remembrance Day in Pittsburgh area

Here are some of public memorial events being held in observance of Holocaust Remembrance Day:


Today

"Nazi Genocide: The Victims of the Holocaust," hosted by the Holocaust Center of the United Jewish Federation of Greater Pittsburgh. Keynote speaker will be Professor Henry Friedlander, an Auschwitz survivor who authored "The Origins of Nazi Genocide: From Euthanasia to the Final Solution." There will be a candle-lighting ceremony, musical performances and a recital of the Kaddish, or prayer for the dead, by Rabbi Mordecai Glatstein. The program begins at 4 p.m., Carnegie Museum Lecture Hall, 4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland.

"Poland, Personally: Private Reflections on a Holocaust Study Tour," features photographs of Pittsburgh teens and adults who studied the Holocaust last summer in Poland. A reception will be held from 1 to 3 p.m. at the Pittsburgh Filmmakers Galleries, 477 Melwood Ave., Oakland. The exhibit will be on display through April 22.


Monday

Temple Emanuel of South Hills , 1250 Bower Hill Road, Mt. Lebanon, begins its Holocaust film and discussion series, 7 to 8:30 p.m. The three-part series will discuss the Holocaust, how victims have been memorialized and what is being done to ensure it doesn't happen again.


Sunday, April 22

The South Hills Interfaith Ministries will host a Holocaust remembrance program to examine the work of Dr. Janusz Korczak, a Polish-Jewish writer and educator as well known in Europe as Anne Frank. Like her, he died in the Holocaust and left behind a diary. The program begins at 7 p.m. at Southminster Presbyterian Church, 799 Washington Road, Mt. Lebanon.

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