Share This Page

PSU finance man Gary Schultz praised for 40 'distinguished' years

Gary Schultz spent more than 40 years at Penn State University, so the school honored him by putting his name on a child care center that opened in September.

Schultz, 62, earned bachelor's and master's degrees from Penn State and went to work for the school in 1971, working his way up to senior vice president for finance and business when he retired in 2009. He managed a staff of 2,500 and oversaw human resources and the university police department.

When his successor left Penn State in July, Schultz returned to the position on an interim basis.

"Gary's contributions have been among the most significant in the history of Penn State," university President Graham B. Spanier said in 2008 when Schultz announced his retirement. "We will forever be grateful for the leadership, wisdom and hard work he provided to his alma mater during the course of a most distinguished career."

Schultz was charged on Saturday -- along with Tim Curley, Penn State's athletic director -- with a felony count of perjury and a summary charge of failing to report child abuse. Charges against the administrators are linked to the state's case against former Penn State defensive coordinator Jerry Sandusky, who was charged with 40 counts related to the sexual abuse of children. Schultz and Curley are expected to surrender to police on Monday.

Schultz has chaired the Penn State Investment Council, which oversees more than $1.6 billion in endowments, and served on the boards of the Milton S. Hershey Medical Center and the Pennsylvania Chamber of Business and Industry, among others.

Dr. Bob Capretto, an Oakmont orthodontist and Penn State alumnus who played football with Sandusky in the late 1960s, praised Schultz as "very smart" and "very unassuming." As someone in charge of spending the university's money, Schultz is one of the most important administrators at the school, he said.

"He basically built that university," Capretto said yesterday.

Curley and Schultz are not the type of administrators who would look the other way if presented with evidence of even a minor violation, Capretto said.

"They don't tolerate much," Capretto said. "They never intentionally broke the rules and worked very hard to know the rules. If it was done, I don't think it was intentional."

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.