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Wecht prosecutor returns to private practice

The prosecutor who headed the federal public corruption cases against Dr. Cyril H. Wecht and the Allegheny County Sheriff's Office is crossing the aisle.

Yesterday was the last day in the U.S. Attorney's Office for Stephen Stallings, who heads down Grant Street from the federal courthouse to go into private practice at Dreier, a law firm in the Koppers Building.

"Most of my career has been in private practice," said Stallings, 40. "And this was the right time for me and my family to make the return."

The failure to convict Wecht was not a factor in deciding to leave, Stallings said.

'Gateways' to get facelifts

Two deteriorating pedestrian "gateways" in the lower North Side could get much-needed overhauls.

Mayor Luke Ravenstahl yesterday targeted railway underpasses on Anderson and Sandusky streets for extensive repairs including new sidewalks and curbs, bright lighting, fresh paint and landscaping.

The pathways beneath the tracks connect streets surrounding PNC Park and other North Shore attractions to Allegheny Center.

Anderson Street will be overhauled first at a cost of about $1.8 million, Public Works Director Guy Costa said.

It will be paid for with city and federal money.

Woman sues after fall from bar

A Whitehall woman sued a North Shore bar, claiming she severely injured her leg after falling off a bar while dancing.

Ashley M. Sauer filed a lawsuit yesterday in Allegheny County Common Pleas Court against McFadden's Pittsburgh, which is on North Shore Drive near PNC Park.

The lawsuit states that Sauer was encouraged to dance on the bar in March 2007. She slipped and struck a cooler, fracturing her right knee and suffering ligament damage and a blood clot, according to the lawsuit.

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