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WCCC conference explores UFO wave

The Pennsylvania Mutual UFO Network will present a Paranormal-UFO Conference Saturday at Westmoreland County Community College in Youngwood.

Pennsylvania was the epicenter of the world's largest UFO wave during the summer, according to the group.

There have been more than 120 UFO reports filed from Pittsburgh to Philadelphia, said John Ventre, the state director for the UFO network.

"We have 25 reports in the Pittsburgh-Westmoreland County area. I get reports of UFOs coming in from Lake Erie in Ohio and across Wheeling, W.Va., into the Pittsburgh area," he said.

The conference, scheduled from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. in the college's Science Hall, will feature expert paranormal and UFO speakers. The morning speakers will discuss ghost hunters and after-life communication. Three speakers after lunch will discuss the UFO phenomenon.

Speakers include Nick Roy, who has taught a paranormal class at WCCC; Shawn Kelly of the Pittsburgh Paranormal Society; Brian Schill, who writes for Haunted Magazine and is founder of the International Parapsychology Research Foundation; Rick Fisher of Paranormal Pa.; and Ventre.

Stan Gordon of Greensburg, who has extensively investigated the "Kecksburg incident," will speak on the wave of UFO-Bigfoot reports in Westmoreland County in 1973.

General admission is $10. Tickets are $15 for seating in the front half of the auditorium. Advance orders and the conference agenda can be obtained at Ventre's Web site at www.12-21-2012-a-prophecy.com/. Ventre can be reached at 412-251-2734.

The network has 3,000 members worldwide and more than 900 certified investigators. The Pennsylvania branch has 127 members and 17 certified investigators. Anyone interested in joining can contact Ventre.

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