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Love found anew at 90 years old -- via the Internet

At 89, Molly Holder didn't have time to wait for love.

"I knew some prince on a white horse wasn't going to ride up and sweep me off my feet, so I had to do it myself," she said.

Acting on a whim, Holder, a widow since 1995, decided to try online dating. She posted a profile on Match.com and soon met Edward Nisbett, 82. She sent him a "wink."

Holder, who in 2008 moved from North Huntingdon to Tallahassee, Fla., found that she had much in common with the widowed Nisbett, a retired metallurgist.

"We learned that we both loved grammar and poetry," said Holder, who spent her career as a newspaper columnist at the Irwin Times Observer and Standard Observer.

This past January, after two months of exchanging emails, Holder and her online beau decided to meet in person.

"We were to meet at this fancy hotel in Tallahassee, and I told him I'll be sitting in the lobby, holding a yellow rose," she said, confessing that she got the idea from a movie.

Holder brought her grandson, Russ Lentz, 41, as a chaperone.

"I thought he was all right, so I left them alone," Lentz said. "And they've been inseparable ever since."

By February, they were engaged. Last weekend, Holder walked down the aisle, a bride at 90 years old.

"We decided not to wait, on account of our age," the new Mrs. Nisbett said.

Her son, Terry Holder, walked her down the aisle of Grace Lutheran Church, near her home in Tallahassee. The bride wore a long-sleeved ivory ensemble, pearls and a veil.

"The pastor said, 'I'm going to read some Scriptures,' and she said, 'Keep it short,'" recalled Lentz, who served as best man. "When you're 90, you can't stand that long," she said.

A week after the wedding, the bride was settling into her new husband's house in Navarre, Fla. So far, the couple's partnership is thoroughly modern -- she cooks dinner and he does the laundry.

"Isn't that nice?" she said.

In the evening, the Scottish-born Mr. Nisbett reads his wife poems by Shakespeare and Robert Burns.

"I just love to hear him with his Scottish accent," she said. "He calls me 'Molly, m'love.' "

In the end, Mrs. Nisbett said, she found her prince after all.

"He's 6 feet 2 with blue eyes, and he has the sweetest disposition," the newlywed said. "He wore a tuxedo to the wedding, and a beautiful red vest. He just looked like Prince Charming."

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