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In the '90s, we heard frequent complaints that the technology rich were not sharing their wealth like the robber barons of yore. Yet now Bill Gates is turning his attention to his philanthropy. That is his personal paradox: he ruthlessly earned those billions and now generously gives them away. Yes, he has a heart. Gates, as it turns out, is a man, not a machine.

Jeff Jarvis From BuzzMachine ( buzzmachine.com )

Al Gore justifies his enjoyment of a carbon-intensive lifestyle in a speech in the UK:

He said he was "carbon neutral" himself and he tried to offset any plane flight or car journey by "purchasing verifiable reductions in CO2 elsewhere". Translation: I am rich enough to benefit from executive jets and Lincolns because I pay my indulgences. All you proles have to give up your cars, flights and air conditioning. The new aristocracy; there's no other way to describe it.

Don Bosch From the Acton Institute PowerBlog ( acton.org/blog )

After the FCC fined CBS $3.3 million for a smut-filled episode of ... Without a Trace , CBS filed a FOIA request asking for information on complaints the show generated. The station found 4,211 people had complained about the episode's depiction of a teen orgy. But according to CBS, it's not clear that any of those 4,221 had ever, you know, seen the show.

Kerry Howley From Hit & Run ( reason.com/hitandrun )

What a ghastly moment it must be for a Muslim when it dawns on him that what he thought was merely some pleasing rituals and the obligation to be a good little person is actually an unbreakable oath to fight an eternal war against un-Islam, no holds barred.

Brian Micklethwait From Brian Micklethwait's Blog ( brianmicklethwait.com )

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