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A look back at Big Media's mayhem

For those Republican presidential candidates who eventually conclude there is no path to the nomination, there is consolation in the notion that they won't be the ones to face the brutal onslaught being prepared for the GOP king of the hill by Team Obama and its army of "objective" media allies.

This time around, the Obama machine cannot run on the fairy dust of hope and change. It cannot suggest after four years of dreadful executive-branch performance that the promised one is on the horizon.

Its only path to victory is the one that finds its opponents even more disliked. So it can be guaranteed that whoever wins the Republican contest will face one of the most scorching personal assaults the country has ever witnessed.

Occasionally, the old-style, thrill-up-my-leg-over-Obama quote still emerges. The Media Research Center's 2011 winners of "Best of Notable Quotables" provide examples. Stephen Marche of Esquire magazine won over judges of the "Obamagasm Award" by energetically asking, "Can we just take a month or two to contemplate him (Obama) the way we might contemplate a painting by Vermeer or a guitar lick by the early-'70s Rolling Stones or a Peyton Manning pass or any other astounding, ecstatic human achievement?"

At least when people said this in 2008, it hadn't been completely disproved.

Diane Sawyer, ABC's evening news anchor, won the "Occupy My Heart and Soul Award" for lathering praise on the anti-capitalist park squatters. "We thought we'd bring you up to date on those protesters, the Occupy Wall Street movement," she panted. "As of tonight, it has spread to more than 250 American cities, more than a thousand countries -- every continent but Antarctica."

There are some 190 countries on Earth, but Sawyer earned points on the left for enthusiastic baloney.

Katie Couric finally conceded her utter failure as anchor of the "CBS Evening News" in May, but she won the "Audacity of Dopes Award for the Wackiest Analysis" by concluding America was so deeply bigoted and consumed by "seething hatred" toward Muslims that we need a sitcom to straighten ourselves out. "Maybe we need a Muslim version of 'The Cosby Show.' ... I know that sounds crazy. But 'The Cosby Show' did so much to change attitudes about African-Americans in this country, and I think sometimes people are afraid of things they don't understand."

Loathing of Obama was still classified daily as racism. Sean Penn won the "Barbra Streisand Political IQ Award for Celebrity Vapidity" by reading tea party minds on CNN and projecting murder fantasies: "You have what I call the 'Get the N-word out of the White House party,' the tea party ... . At the end of the day, there's a big bubble coming out of their heads saying, you know, 'Can we just lynch him?"'

The transition from Obama adoration to Republican defenestration was exemplified by Chris Matthews on MSNBC. He earned the "Mean-Spirited, Nutty, Blathering Chris Award" for just blurting out against Newt Gingrich, "But he looks like a car bomber. He looks like a car bomber ... . He's got that crazy Mephistophelian grin of his. He looks like he loves torturing. Look at the guy! I mean this is not the face of a president."

But the real award-winning quote (for denying liberal bias) was this delusional Matthews gem captured by Politico: "Hardball is absolutely nonpartisan."

2012, here we go.

L. Brent Bozell III is president of the Media Research Center.

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