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Huffing & puffing & disappointing

Editor's note: Nikki Finke is a business and political columnist covering entertainment and Big Media for LA Weekly. Her job was characterized incorrectly.

Matt Drudge can sleep easy.

Arianna Huffington's much ballyhooed "Huffington Post" -- a new Web site whose chief gimmick is a Malibu Beach party's worth of celebrity bloggers -- is no threat.

If you haven't heard, huffingtonpost.com features the daily blathering of scores of La-La-Landers -- Rob Reiner, Bill Maher, John Cusack, Julia Louis-Dreyfus, et al. -- and scores of savvy inner-Beltway politicos such as David Corn, Mike McCurry, Joe Scarborough and Danielle Crittenden.

From the advance hype, you'd have thought that the multiblog site, which debuted Monday, was going to do for the blogosphere what CNN did for TV news. It won't.

It's way too early to declare it a flop. But it's easy to see why the media criticism has run from brutally cruel to "Could this possibly be this dull and uninformative forever?"

Not every celebrity embarrasses himself.

Quincy Jones' rumination on Michael Jackson's sordid decline is wise, but contains so much God-talk he may have his star on Hollywood Boulevard removed.

"Seinfeld" co-creator Larry David's defense of U.N. Ambassador-designate John Bolton as a fellow abuser-of-employees is clever satire.

Rob Reiner's ranting about the news media being stooges of the Bush administration and voters being misled on Iraq, etc., etc., would make a great sendup of a demented Hollywood liberal, except he's being serious.

Reiner's meat-headed rant gives credence to L.A. Weekly Nikki Finke's conspiratorial suspicion that Arianna is now "a conservative mole." Finke, a business/political columnist, covering entertainment, wrote in her Huffington Post-trashing column that the Greek-born author-pundit "has served up liberal celebs like red meat on a silver platter for the salivating and Hollywood-hating right wing to chew up and spit out."

Finke could be right. Maybe Arianna -- who has morphed from the right-wing conservative spouse of a multimillionaire Republican congressman to a divorced big-government progressive do-gooder -- is a double agent for her mid-'90s pal, Newt.

There's no doubt celebrities are going to be eaten alive by the pros -- the politicians, pundits and journalists -- Arianna invited to her 300-ring circus. Byron York has already bitten into sports guy Jim Lampley, who opined in his blog that he still thinks Bush stole Ohio last fall.

And conservative Danielle Crittenden, who knows how to mock Hollywood, blogged a clever parody memo to President Bush that plugs a new movie whose heroine is a brave, pro-life Republican congresswoman who fights for family values.

Assembling scores of celebrity bloggers in one place sounds like a really good idea -- until you go there and find it's mostly just a bunch of people with little to say talking to themselves.

At huffingtonpost.com , more is much less. There's no strong single point of view, which is what all the best blogs have. There's virtually no interaction or squabbling between libs and conservatives. Libertarians, as usual, apparently weren't invited.

Arianna's got lots of tinkering to do before she provides anything close to "a tantalizing mixture of politics, wit and wisdom." She has to learn how to be an editor and a better ringmaster.

Maybe she'll figure it out. Meantime, her Internet Free Hollywood may do America some good by forcing the cloistered Hollywood community to debate some nonliberal arguments and ideas it's not used to even hearing.

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