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Climate lies

The first casualty of "climate change" rhetoric continues to be the truth.

Take, for instance, President Obama's speech to the United Nations on Tuesday. Myron Ebell, the noted director of energy and global warming policy at the Competitive Enterprise Institute, documents at least four misrepresentations:

• The president said the threat is "serious," "urgent" and "growing." But Mr. Ebell notes that global mean temperatures increased only slightly from 1977 to 2000 and have been "flat" since then.

• Obama: "Rising sea levels threaten every coastline." Not so, says Ebell -- "(S)ea levels have been rising on and off since the end of the last Ice Age 13,000 years ago. The rate ... has not increased in recent decades over the 19th- and 20th-century average."

• Storms and floods are "more powerful" and "threaten every continent," said Mr. Obama. Ebell: "(T)here is no upward global trend in storms or floods."

• Obama: "More frequent drought and crop failures" are exacerbating hunger and conflict where they already thrive. But Ebell says that's simply false.

To paraphrase 19th-century French economist Frederic Bastiat, "climate change" theologians need only a few words to set forth their half-truths whereas opponents are forced to resort to long and arid dissertations to expose their lies.

This is the sad state of the global warming debate. Much sadder is that the president of the United States is engaged in such misrepresentations.

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