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Cooler heads

Another month, another set of data that counters global-warming orthodoxy -- and another reason why the climate debate must stop generating more heat than light if it's to arrive at scientifically valid conclusions.

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's National Climatic Data Center has released its "State of the Climate National Overview October 2009." The report finds that the month just past was America's third-coolest October on record. All but six states and all but one of nine "climate regions" had below-normal temperatures.

Though it covers just the U.S. climate during a brief period and the data are preliminary, it's reports such as this that, over time, add up to a most inconvenient truth for "green" high priests:

There's been no significant warming since 1998. Yet those who blame mankind for a phenomenon whose scientific basis is far from settled rush headlong toward December's United Nations Copenhagen climate conference, hoping to cripple the U.S. economy to atone for that "sin."

The only faith that provides a proper approach to the climate debate is faith in the scientific method. Conferring unwarranted credibility on self-interested prophets of legitimately questionable doom only clouds the picture.

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