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Christmas briefing ...

We're all hearing about hunger this Christmas. And, indeed, there is hunger in America. Thus, we must do all we can to help alleviate the problem. That said, however, The Heritage Foundation's Ed Feulner reminds that the statistics regularly are twisted. To wit, it's widely being reported, and quite incorrectly, that an Agriculture Department study finds that 1 in 6 Americans went hungry in America in 2008. Worrying that one might run out of food and actually having no food are not the same. Thus, the first way to begin addressing hunger in America is to be honest about the statistics. ... Writing in London's Daily Telegraph, Janet Daley says the most important adjective of 2009 had to be "global." But, she cautions, the word has "taken on sacred connotations" in which too many people believe that "any action taken in its name must be inherently virtuous, whereas the decisions of individual countries are necessarily 'narrow' and self-serving." We remind that "global" too often is a euphemism for nothing better than "democratic socialism" and that those who are fortunate enough to understand this should keep fighting the right and good fight against it. ... The Christian world is about to begin shutting down regular operations for the celebration of Christmas. And as the hustle and bustle of it all comes to a crescendo, pause and reflect and practice the real reason for the season. A blessed and merry Christmas to one and all.

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