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The Mann grant

Granting more than half a million federal stimulus dollars to a professor whose Climategate role prompted a Penn State University investigation is politically motivated misuse of public money at its worst.

Michael Mann received the three-year, $541,184 grant in June, according to The National Center for Public Policy Research, a nonpartisan educational foundation in Washington. Creator of the discredited "hockey stick" temperature graph that purportedly buttressed the case for man-made global warming, he's a key figure in the leaked Climategate e-mails that show data were manipulated and destroyed and contrary research was suppressed to bolster scientifically suspect climate-change orthodoxy.

Penn State is right to scrutinize Mr. Mann's "scholarship." But the university need not await its own decision on his future employment to do the right thing for taxpayers. As the center urges, Penn State should return the money to the U.S. Treasury immediately.

Whoever approved Mann's grant should be removed from the public payroll. And all other stimulus grants should be reviewed to tell taxpayers just how much of their money was misspent to promote Democrat eco-wacko dogma under the dubious stimulus guise of "job creation."

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