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The tea partyers: It's about liberty

As the left works overtime to underestimate, if not outright disparage, the import and impact of the growing tea party movement, some telling demographics have been revealed by the unlikeliest of sources -- The New York Times and CBS News.

A poll sponsored by the traditionally liberal news organizations takes a baby step in debunking the talking points of "progressive" puppet-masters that tea partyers are lemming-like Cro-Magnons, necks painted red, who tuck sawed-off shotguns into their bib overall cut-offs.

Truth be told, these modern-day Sons and Daughters of Liberty are wealthier than the general public and better educated. That is, they are industrious -- they actually work and pay taxes -- and know that tickling sensation at their knees is not someone getting fresh but the hands of Leviathan administering a continual fleecing through the hole torn in their pockets.

Of course, such a poll would not be complete without the obligatory attempt to paint tea partyers as angry white men who are insensitive to the poor, might just be racists, by golly, and dislike big government but expect their government entitlements to be preserved.

Sigh.

Cautioned Cicero: "Only in states in which the power of the people is supreme has liberty any abode." It's a precept those seeking to tax liberty into submission, or somehow paint it as subversive and extreme, would be wise to remember.

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