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ACORN & Project Vote: More skulduggery

Documents obtained by Judicial Watch show the perniciously corrupt, leftist influence of ACORN and its Project Vote affiliate on voter registration in Colorado.

Alleging violation of a federal law requiring public-assistance offices to offer registration, the groups threatened litigation in 2009. The Democrat then-secretary of state, backed by leftist billionaire George Soros and liberal MoveOn.org, responded by, among other things, sharing registration data with Project Vote and ensuring its approval of changes to registration forms.

The result• In 2009-10, 8 percent of Colorado registration forms rejected as invalid or duplicate -- thus fraudulent -- came from public-assistance agencies. That was more than four times the national 1.9-percent average.

The Colorado secretary of state even collaborated with Amy Busefink, then managing Project Vote's national online program -- and under indictment in a Nevada case concerning illegal bonuses paid to ACORN registration workers. She later entered an "Alford plea," acknowledging conviction's likelihood without admitting criminal acts, to two misdemeanor conspiracy counts.

Which shows there are not any lengths to which ACORN, Project Vote and their successor organizations would not go to undermine voting's integrity.

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