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More climate clucking: Faulty 'road map'

As if the European Union didn't have enough problems with members going broke, it's now pushing for a new climate-change "framework" in advance of next month's United Nations conference on global warming.

Here we go again.

Since the meltdown two years ago in Copenhagen on carbon curbs that would clobber developed nations, the Church of Global Warming has been unable to draft a credible creed. Chief EU climate negotiator Artur Runge-Metzger says he doubts one will materialize at the U.N. climate conference scheduled Nov. 28 in Durban.

But Mr. Runge-Metzger tells the International Business Times that conference delegates should "formulate a road map that points to a global legal framework" because the Kyoto Protocol -- a case study in climate extremism -- runs out next year.

In other words, forget all the mounting evidence that disputes man-made climate change and its unrealized predictions. Instead, the world should follow U.N.-backed scientists who warn of "irreparable damage" and extreme weather because of carbon emissions.

To "save" the planet, wealthy nations should pay enormous sums to impoverished and/or "emerging" economies, which sit back and collect the cash. No thanks.

What hangs in the air is the unmistakable stench of wealth redistribution in pursuit of social re-engineering and, yes, even new world orders. And it's backed by the worst that junk science has to offer.

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