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Climate cluckers: Tricks of the trade

It's not just the far-reaching claims from the world's leading climate cluckers about "man-made global warming" that demand further inquiry -- it's what they continually attempt to hide.

Phil Jones, the former (and still controversial) lead climate researcher at the University of East Anglia, refused to share U.S.-funded climate data with skeptical scientists. As reported by Forbes, among e-mails made public recently is this explanation from Professor Jones in 2009:

"I've been told that the (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change) is above national FOI (Freedom of Information) Acts." Additionally, "Any work we have done in the past is done on the back of the research grants we get -- and has to be well hidden. I've discussed this with the main funder (the U.S. Department of Energy) in the past and they are happy about not releasing the original station data."

And what's the harm in releasing the data -- unless conclusions cannot be replicated?

Since the latest leaked e-mail controversy, Jones has made the data public but not the methods of adjusting them. "We see the data go in and we see the data that come out as the finished product -- but we don't know how they adjust it in between," Anthony Watts, a meteorologist, told FoxNews.com .

None of this is really surprising. After all, a good illusionist never reveals his tricks.

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