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ACORN's strings

Corrupt ACORN affiliate Project Vote -- former employer of President Obama -- is pulling Justice Department and White House strings to register more voters on public assistance, documents newly obtained by Judicial Watch show.

It's happening despite voter-registration fraud convictions of at least 70 ACORN/Project Vote employees in 12 states since 2006. And even though more than a third of the 1.3 million registrations ACORN/Project Vote submitted during the 2008 election cycle proved invalid, according to a 2009 House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform report.

In newly revealed e-mails, Estelle Rogers, Project Vote's advocacy director, discusses meetings with administration officials. She pushes for federal lawsuits alleging National Voter Registration Act violations by states she deems insufficiently aggressive in registering public-assistance recipients.

Why is the administration dancing to her tune• Because "low-income voters" are "an important voting demographic for the Obama presidential campaign," says Judicial Watch.

Tom Fitton, Judicial Watch's president, says Project Vote-Justice "collusion" is "a significant threat to the integrity of the 2012 elections." It's also a mockery of Justice's proper role in voting-rights enforcement.

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