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The Thursday wrap

A CBS News poll finds that a whopping 80 percent of respondents said they are no better off today compared to when President Obama took office, reports Jim Geraghty of National Review Online. And 37 percent say they're worse off. These troubling findings aren't as easy to spin as, say, the Labor Department's February jobs report. Despite all the whoop-de-do, that assessment still pegs the nation's unemployment rate at an abysmal 8.3 percent, a three-year low, according to BusinessWeek. And that, in itself, is a low-ball figure. ... At a $10,000-per-couple Democrat fundraiser this week in the Georgetown home of Sen. John Kerry, Vice President Joe Biden reportedly couldn't resist putting down so-called out-of-touch Republicans who "don't know what it means to be middle class." After all, donors in attendance reportedly dined on strip steak, not filet mignon. Mr. Biden's understanding of the middle class rivals that of the fella who says he's retaining the veep as his running mate. ... And speaking of Mr. Obama , the commander in chief told a Denver TV station that he's "proud generally" of U.S. forces in Afghanistan. Now there's a stand-up guy. We suppose his supporters, based on the latest polls, are no less proud, generally , of him.

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