Share This Page

Pitt says Petersen Events Center sold out

For a fourth consecutive year, Pitt has sold its allotment of men's basketball season tickets at Petersen Events Center.

In making the announcement Thursday, athletic director Jeff Long said he anticipated a limited number of single-game tickets would be availabile for some games because the school is likely to receive returned tickets from the team's opponents.

"It is tremendously energizing to see the enthusiasm and support for our basketball program," Long said. "It's not a coincidence that the past four years rank among the best in Pitt's 100 years of basketball. A packed, exciting arena has been our winning edge and we appreciate the great fans who have made the Petersen Events Center one of college basketball's best venues."

The development is significant for the university following a settlement out of court of a lawsuit filed by a group of previous season-ticket holders who became upset when they were informed of a restructured seating policy at the 12,500-seat arena.

The change was made in February to raise money for scholarships and improved facilities.

"I don't apologize for us needing to raise more revenue," Long said at the time.

Pitt has experienced a 400 percent increase in season-ticket sales over the past four years. The university sold 2,700 season tickets in 2001-02 -- the last year the Panthers played at Fitzgerald Field House -- and sold nearly 11,000 heading into the 2005-06 season.

The additional 1,400 tickets are allotted to Pitt students.

"There's not a lot of teams in the country that's selling out a 12,500-seat arena," Pitt coach Jamie Dixon said. "It says a lot about our program and the athletic department. I've been real excited about our students. Look at the energy they brought to the exhibition games."

Pitt averaged 6,734 for its two preseason games against NCAA Division II teams Slippery Rock and Indiana (Pa.).

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.