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Pitt Panthers add 2 football recruits

Pitt accelerated its recruiting efforts for the 2011 class Friday by getting verbal commitments from two heavily recruited football standouts from Ohio and New Jersey.

The Panthers have received seven early commitments - including versatile athlete Bill Belton of Winslow Township (N.J.) and wide receiver Justin Olack of the storied Massillon (Ohio) program.

Olack, a 6-foot-3, 195-pound senior-to-be, helped lead Massillon to the Division I state playoffs. He was the team's second leading pass-catcher with 49 receptions for 763 yards and three touchdowns.

Olack, a former quarterback, is expected to add speed to a Pitt receiving corps that includes All-Big East flanker Jon Baldwin and Mike Shanahan. Olack, who also considered Indiana, Toledo and Ball State, had 17 catches for 229 yards during the Tigers' four-game playoff run.

Olack, recruited by Pitt's defensive coordinator Phil Bennett, covers the 40-yard dash in 4.55 seconds.

Belton, a 5-foot-9, 191-pounder, also had scholarship offers from Cincinnati, Florida, Louisville, Maryland, Oregon, Penn State, Purdue, South Carolina and West Virginia.

He was recruited by secondary coach Jeff Hafley and offensive line coach Tony Wise.

A dual-threat quarterback who passed for 2,200 yards and 14 touchdowns and rushed for 700 yards and 15 touchdowns, Belton projects as a playmaking multi-purpose receiver. Rivals.com ranks him the No. 28 "athlete" among the nation's seniors-to-be.

The Panthers' other Class of 2011 commitments include Hyattsville (Md.) DeMatha tight end Sam Collura, Ramsey (N.J.) Don Bosco Prep quarterback Gary Nova, Central Dauphin offensive lineman Artie Rowell, Dallastown linebacker Ben Kline and Sicklerville (N.J.) Timbercreek linebacker Quinton Alston.

Staff writer Kevin Gorman contributed to this story.

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