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Pitt to visit Tennessee as part of Big East-SEC Challenge

he Pitt men's basketball team will get a chance to avenge its most lopsided loss from last season.

The Panthers will visit the University of Tennessee on Dec. 3 as part of the 2011-12 Big East-SEC Challenge. The schedule for the fifth-year event was released this afternoon.

Pitt lost to the Volunteers, 83-76, last season at Consol Energy Center.

Also, West Virginia will play at Mississippi State on Dec. 3 as part of the 12-game event. Four Big East teams, Marquette, Notre Dame, Villanova and USF, are not part of the Big East-SEC Challenge.

In other notable games for the 2011-12 season, St. John's will play at Kentucky, Syracuse will host Florida and defending national champion Connecticut will play host to Arkansas.

The Big East/SEC format has changed this season, with 12 games being hosted at on-campus facilities. The past four years the event featured four doubleheaders were played at off-campus arenas.

Tennessee, under first-year coach Cuonzo Martin, lost Scotty Hopson and Tobias Harris, who both declared for early-entry in the NBA draft.

There will be a familiar face on Tennessee. Dwight Miller, a 6-foot-8, 240-pound forward who transferred from Pitt following the 2009-10 season, signed today with the Vols after playing last year for Midland (Texas) College.

Here is the complete schedule of challenge games:

Thursday, Dec. 1

St. John's at No. 2 Kentucky

Georgetown at No. 14 Alabama

Providence at South Carolina

Mississippi at DePaul

Friday, Dec. 2

No. 7 Vanderbilt at No. 9 Louisville

Nov. 12 Florida at No. 4 Syracuse

No. 19 Cincinnati at Georgia

Auburn at Seton Hall

Saturday, Dec. 3

Arkansas at No. 6 Connecticut

No. 17 Pittsburgh at Tennessee

West Virginia at Mississippi State

LSU at Rutgers.

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