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Central Catholic QB Sunseri commits to Louisville

With some of the best football talent in the WPIAL coming through the front door every day, Central Catholic had coaches from several BCS conferences walking its halls.

Quarterback Tino Sunseri did his part Friday to lessen the traffic, verbally committing to Big East champion Louisville.

"It got to the point where we were sitting down with a new face every day," Sunseri said.

Although Sunseri said Louisville showed the most sincere interest in him, he also had offers from Florida State, Colorado, South Florida, Southern Mississippi and Buffalo. Northwestern, Boston College and Rutgers also had visited the school.

Sunseri will become the most recent Central Catholic quarterback to commit to a Division I school, following Dan Marino, Marc Bulger, Joe Felitsky and Shane Murray (now a linebacker at Pitt).

Sunseri says he's eager to go to a BCS school that is usually among the top teams in the nation

He also chose Louisville because of familiarity with the program.

His father, Sal, a former Pitt All-American linebacker who's a Carolina Panthers defensive line coach, was on Louisville's staff when Tino was in grade school. Recruiting coordinator Greg Nord, who was the point man in recruiting Sunseri, is a holdover from those days.

"It was a nice backup to know I have been there," he said. "I know what the people are like, and I know some of the coaches."

Sunseri, a transfer from Weddington (N.C.) High School, led Central Catholic (10-2) to the Quad South championship last season, completing 86-of-151 passes for 1,408 yards and 14 touchdowns.

Central Catholic advanced to the WPIAL semifinals, but Sunseri said the team "underachieved."

Sunseri hinted that he may average nearly 20 passes a game after throwing for only 12 last season.

"We have something to prove this year," he said.

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