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Sporting News names Dixon national coach of the year

For the third time in as many seasons, Pitt men's basketball coach Jamie Dixon earned a national coach of the year award.

Dixon was named the 2010-11 National Coach of the Year by The Sporting News on Tuesday.

Pitt (28-6) went a school-best 15-3 in the Big East on the way to the regular-season championship. The Panthers were a No. 1 seed in the NCAA Tournament, before losing to Butler in the Round of 32.

Dixon won two national coach of the year honors following the 2009-10 season (Jim Phelan and USA Basketball), and the Naismith National Coach of the Year following the 2008-09 season.

Dixon, an eighth-year coach, finished the 2010-11 season as the winningest coach in Big East history with a .708 winning percentage in league games (109-45). His .783 overall winning percentage ranks third among active NCAA Division I coaches.

Dixon is the second Pitt coach to earn The Sporting News National Coach of the Year honors. Ben Howland received the award following the 2001-02 season.

• Duquesne senior forward Bill Clark was one of eight players named to the CollegeInsider.com 2011 Riley Wallace All-America team, named after the former 20-year coach at Hawaii. The team highlights players who have excelled without much national attention. CollegeInsider.com said voting was based on a player's leadership, clutch play and production in all phases of the game. Clark led Duquesne (19-13) in scoring this season with an average of 16.3 points and ranks seventh all-time on the school's scoring list with 1,628.

• Tennessee's program appears to be in shambles after the firing of popular coach Bruce Pearl. Volunteers athletics officials still insist it's an attractive place to be despite ongoing NCAA compliance problems. Tennessee athletics director Mike Hamilton said in a statement Monday that the search would begin immediately for a new coach — who also could be facing a depleted roster by the time he arrives on campus. Tennessee's star freshman forward, Tobias Harris, planned to test the waters of the NBA Draft for a few weeks before deciding whether to return for his sophomore season. Junior guard Scotty Hopson may do the same.

• Providence hired former Fairfield coach Ed Cooley to replace the fired Keno Davis. Cooley led the Stags to a school-record 25 wins and a MAAC regular-season championship this year.

• Missouri coach Mike Anderson's agent said he is negotiating a new contract with the school amid continued reports that Arkansas is also interested in hiring him.

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