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QB Newsome transferring from Penn State

Quarterback Kevin Newsome said he plans to transfer from Penn State and hopes to find a school where he can play immediately.

"I will be transferring as soon as possible," he said Thursday night. "But that's all I can say."

Newsome said he didn't know whether he will sit out the 2011 season.

"It depends on the school," he said.

Newsome, a 20-year-old junior from Portsmouth, Va., was third on the depth chart behind 2010 starters Rob Bolden and Matt McGloin, a former walk-on. Coach Joe Paterno, who opened practice with the team yesterday, has not named a starter. If Newsome leaves, Penn State's depth at quarterback will be seriously compromised because redshirt freshman Paul Jones (Sto-Rox) is wrestling with academic difficulties.

As a freshman in 2009, Newsome was the backup to All-Big Ten quarterback Daryll Clark, and he appeared in 10 games. But his playing time dropped as a sophomore: Newsome appeared in just six games, completing 6 of 13 passes for 78 yards for no touchdowns or interceptions.

Newsome came to Penn State as a four-star recruit and the No. 4 quarterback prospect in the country, according to rivals.com .

PSU No. 25 in coaches' poll

Penn State is ranked No. 25, and the Big East was blanked, in the USA Today coaches' preseason football poll , released Thursday.

The Nittany Lions, one of five Big Ten teams in the rankings, return 44 letter-winners, including 15 starters. The Big Ten, Big 12 (five) and SEC (eight) are the only conferences with more than two teams in the poll.

West Virginia received 149 voting points in the poll — putting the Mountaineers at No. 27 overall — and Pitt earned three points (No. 47).

Oklahoma is the preseason No. 1 team with 42 of 59 first-place votes. Alabama is second with 13 first-place votes. Oregon (two), LSU (two) and Florida State round out the top five.

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