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Prospect watch: Seton-LaSalle's Scott Orndoff

From Bruce Gradkowski and Bill Stull to Joey DelSardo and Carmen Connolly, Seton-La Salle has produced its share of major-college quarterbacks and receivers. Seton-La Salle coach Greg Perry believes the player who arrived as a quarterback but grew into a pass-catching tight end could be the most heavily recruited Rebel in a long time.

Since reopening his recruitment after Paul Chryst, Bob Bostad and Joe Rudolph left Wisconsin for Pitt, Scott Orndoff has received scholarship offers from Boston College, Michigan, Michigan State, Pitt and Virginia, as well as Wisconsin.

"I don't know if we've had the caliber we'll have with this kid. Anyone who uses a tight end in their offense is going to be interested because of his size, speed and strength," Perry said of Orndoff, who had 20 receptions for 348 yards and four touchdowns as a junior. "He was always a quarterback, so he's learning a new type of football, not only a new position. Now, every play he's getting hit. The future is going to be brighter for him because he's just learning how to play this part of football."

Perry is hoping that the amount of interest Orndoff attracts will also benefit Rebels quarterback Luke Brumbaugh, a Division I prospect who passed for 1,484 yards and 14 touchdowns as a junior last fall.

"His arm is probably better than anybody I've had. The ball comes out of his hand unbelievably," Perry said. "Every one of Scott's catches on his highlight tape is from Luke. Coaches are going to be wondering who is getting the ball to him. It could be good for everyone involved."

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