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Pens move practice to Boston

• Old Man Winter has punished the Penguins this holiday season. They were forced to move a scheduled Wednesday practice from Pittsburgh to Boston due to inclement weather in the northeast. The Penguins chartered a plane that left Pittsburgh around 9 a.m., landed in Boston around 11 a.m. and practiced at Harvard University in nearby Cambridge, Mass. The change in plans was made in anticipation of an afternoon snowstorm that eventually dumped nearly 9 inches on the greater Boston arena. This development came slightly more than a week after the Penguins were forced to travel to Buffalo via bus for a game against the Sabres on Dec. 22 because of a snowstorm.

• Practice was short but taxing and included the surprise returns of right wing Tyler Kennedy and defenseman Kris Letang, each of whom participated in full drills. Kennedy (sprained knee) has missed 13 consecutive games dating to sustaining his injury Dec. 3 at the New York Rangers. Letang (undisclosed injury) has not played in the past four games since he was hurt on Dec. 22 at Buffalo. Neither player is expected to dress tonight for a game at Boston.

• Years from now, hockey historians may recall 2008 as the Year of Evgeni Malkin, who was dominant despite failing to record a point in three of the final four games played in the calendar year. Malkin's 2008 stats (81 regular-season games): 47 goals, 77 assists, 124 points and plus-39 rating. Malkin recorded multiple points in 37 games (45.7 percent) and was held without a point in only 18 (22.2 percent).

DIGIT

102 -- Regular-season points earned by Penguins in 2008, out of a possible 162.

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