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Penguins' Letang tries to put bite behind him

Penguins defenseman Kris Letang admitted it isn't something easily forgotten. But he's trying to make the alleged biting incident in an October game in Philadelphia a distant memory.

With the Flyers back in town, Letang was reminded that Scott Hartnell allegedly bit his finger Oct. 8.

"I'm going to try to keep my gloves on this time," Letang said.

Letang is still irritated by what took place, but said all the right things following the team's pre-game skate Tuesday.

"I'm trying not to focus on it," Letang said. "You have to forget about it. You can't get into scrums against them after whistles. It's the same as always."

The Penguins admitted before the game that battles with the Flyers always have their attention, sometimes even days in advance. These games remind coach Dan Bylsma of contests between Anaheim and Los Angeles when he played for both franchises. This rivalry, he admitted, is even bigger.

"These kinds of games have a different feel," he said.

» The Penguins awarded the 2009 Bob Johnson Memorial Scholarship to Latrobe Area senior Ryan LaDuke. In three years at Latrobe, LaDuke has produced 55 goals and 100 points. The award represents excellence on the ice, in the community and in the class room. It has been awarded every year since 1992.

» Left wing Max Talbot was the odd man out of the Penguins' rotation against the Flyers. The team wanted Eric Godard in the lineup against Philadelphia. Talbot has one goal since returning to the lineup four weeks ago.

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