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Penguins seek students for arena's simultaneous toilet flush

The Pittsburgh Penguins need help with a test any student is sure to pass: Flushing the toilet.

The Pens will host "The Student Flush" on June 10, part of the ongoing construction at Consol Energy Center.

Team President David Morehouse said all 386 toilets and urinals in the Uptown arena will be flushed simultaneously to test whether pumps can handle the water flow. Similar tests were conducted before the 2001 openings of Heinz Field and PNC Park.

"Students make up such a large part of our fan base that we thought we'd offer them a chance to participate and help us out," Morehouse said in a statement. "People probably don't even know that this is a requirement, but you have to do it once in every new arena."

The name of the event is a riff on the Student Rush program, in which local students can buy last-minute hockey tickets for $20.

For this event, the seats are free. Those who participate in the ticket program will receive a text message this week so they can volunteer for the group flush.

The Penguins will randomly pick 125 students, who can each bring one friend. Students must be 18 or older.

In all, 400 flushers are needed; construction workers from PJ Dick/Hunt and McKamish Inc. will make up the difference.

Though a toilet flush is a simple part of everyday life, the Pens are determined to make an event out of it. Participants will get a T-shirt bearing the logo of the flush event on the front, and the name and number of a current or former Penguins player on the back.

Broadcaster Phil Bourque will emcee the event, and team mascot Iceburgh will cheer on flushers. Pizza and beverages will be served afterward.

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