Share This Page

Penguins' Staal still on crutches

» Center Jordan Staal was re-evaluated by the Penguins' medical staff Monday morning, and the team provided no update on his status. Staal's right foot, operated on twice during the summer because of infected tissue, was covered by protective casing. He is using crutches. Staal is expected to speak publicly Wednesday for the first time since the Penguins announced last Thursday he will miss between five and six weeks.

» FSN Pittsburgh producer Lowell MacDonald Jr. returned to practice for the first time since he was suspended last January. The Penguins learned over the summer that he would resume duties as producer of the cable network's telecasts of team games. His suspension came after an investigation into his decision not to make NHL replay officials in Toronto aware of all available video footage for a possible short-handed goal by former Flyers winger Simon Gagne.

» Coach Dan Bylsma said center Casey Pierro-Zabotel will miss three to four weeks with a broken finger. He was injured by a pick during practice Sunday. Also, Bylsma said notable players to dress tomorrow for the first hockey game at Consol Energy Center will include centers Sidney Crosby and Evgeni Malkin, and defenseman Brooks Orpik.

» Left wing Brent Sterling scored twice during the third scrimmage of training camp. Top prospect Simon Despres, a defenseman, made the scrimmage memorable for his penalty-shot goal against starting goaltender Marc-Andre Fleury.

» The Penguins welcomed two local youth hockey teams to Consol Energy Center on Sunday night to simulate a game-night environment for the in-game operations staff. The game went to a long shootout, prompting public address announcer Ryan Mill to declare, "This was the most exciting event in the history of Consol Energy Center."

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.