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Penguins' Crosby resumes on-ice workouts

Penguins center Sidney Crosby has resumed on-ice workouts, the team and his agent confirmed tonight.

The on-ice workouts are part of his regular summer training program.

He last participated in on-ice workouts in April while the Penguins played in the first round of the Stanley Cup playoffs before he was shut down because of headaches.

Crosby's confidants believes those headaches were the result of a sinus infection and not a recurrence of concussion symptoms.

The workouts do not guarantee Crosby will be ready for training camp in September, and he has yet to receive medical clearance for physical contact.

He missed the final 41 games of this past NHL season after being diagnosed with a concussion Jan. 6.

Crosby, who is training near his home in Halifax, Nova Scotia, could not be reached for comment.

In May, he was cleared by UPMC's Dr. Michael Collins for normal off-ice offseason workouts, Penguins general manager Ray Shero said then.

Shero could not be reached for comment about the latest developments.

The Penguins were guardedly optimistic after that diagnosis that Crosby could be ready for camp, when it is expected he will engage in contact drills for the first time.

Crosby normally begins skating in mid-July during the offseason. The Penguins were hopeful in May that he could return to the ice this month for his usual routine.

Crosby was the NHL's leader in goals and points at the time of his last game — Jan. 5 against Tampa at Consol Energy Center. Starting with the Winter Classic at Heinz Field on Jan. 1, he absorbed two blindside blows in the span of four days. Those hits are generally believed to have caused what Crosby labeled as his first concussion.

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Penguins Development Camp

Penguins Development Camp

Pittsburgh Penguins development camp at Consol Energy Center July 2011.

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