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Penguins sit winger Kennedy against Jets

WINNIPEG, Manitoba — Penguins right winger Tyler Kennedy was held out of the game Monday against the Winnipeg Jets because of concussion-like symptoms, coach Dan Bylsma said, and he was being evaluated to determine more about his status.

Indications were strong that Kennedy also will miss the game Tuesday at Minnesota.

Kennedy appeared in all six games, including the Penguins' loss Saturday to Buffalo, without missing a shift. He first reported his symptoms to the team's athletic trainers late Sunday night after arriving in Winnipeg.

Asked if Kennedy was hurt in the Buffalo game, Bylsma replied, "I'm not entirely sure." He declined further comment on the matter.

General manager Ray Shero said Monday night that Kennedy's tests were being sent back to Pittsburgh to be evaluated by the Penguins' doctors.

In Kennedy's absence, right winger Arron Asham was bumped up to the third line with Mark Letestu and Matt Cooke.

"We've seen Arron produce in the playoffs, so we know he can handle a bigger role," Bylsma said.

Bylsma said forwards Craig Adams and Joe Vitale also could see increased roles.

> > Bylsma, on Sidney Crosby, one of four injured players who did not make the trip: "He was cleared for contact a number of days ago, and he's doing that back in Pittsburgh right now. Hopefully, he can continue on with his progress. There's no timetable now for a return to game action."

> > Evgeni Malkin, another of those four players, will not play Tuesday in Minnesota, Shero said Monday night. The Penguins previously had not ruled that out.

> > With Marc-Andre Fleury starting Monday night, it's expected that Brent Johnson will start in goal Tuesday.

> > Winnipeg wasn't nearly as short-handed as the Penguins, but the Jets had to scratch left winger Evander Kane, their most dangerous forward, because of a lower-body injury.

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