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Penguins hoping right winger Kennedy isn't lost to injury

NEWARK, N.J. — The Penguins, showing signs of good health for the first time in months, hope they won't be without right wing Tyler Kennedy when they visit Montreal on Tuesday.

Kennedy left Sunday's 5-2 loss in New Jersey with 2:21 remaining in the third period with an apparent foot or ankle injury. He was in considerable pain while leaving the ice, and he required the assistance of trainer Chris Stewart while hobbling to the locker room after leaving the ice.

The Penguins were unsure of the nature nor severity of the injury following the game.

"I don't know," coach Dan Bylsma said. "I know he's getting evaluated. We'll see."

Kennedy, who played most of the afternoon on a line with center Cal O'Reilly and left wing Steve Sullivan, registered four shots on New Jersey goalie Martin Brodeur but was held without a point.

> > It could easily be argued that the line of center Evgeni Malkin, right wing James Neal and left wing Chris Kunitz is the NHL's finest unit. Against New Jersey, however, the Penguins' top line had a day to forget. Although Malkin scored a power-play goal, the Penguins' top line was a combined minus-12. All three players on the top line were a minus-4. Star defenseman Kris Letang was a minus-3.

> > O'Reilly registered his first point with the Penguins in the second period. While standing in the right wing circle, O'Reilly made a nifty pass to defenseman Matt Niskanen, who scored his third goal of the season.

"I'm getting more comfortable," O'Reilly said. "I'm more comfortable with the system now. I think the more I play, the more confidence will start to show. I feel good."

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