Share This Page

Jeffrey looks to hang at center after the Penguins get healthy

MONTREAL — When healthy, the Penguins are blessed with the finest collection of centers in hockey.

Center Dustin Jeffrey would like to remain in the lineup when centers Sidney Crosby and Jordan Staal return, and that might require more offensive punch than what he has produced so far. Jeffrey, who came back too early from ACL surgery in October, is finally healthy.

Now, he's waiting for the points to come.

Jeffrey has scored two goals and two assists in 18 games, and three of those points came in a Jan. 20 game against the Canadiens.

"The legs aren't the issue now," said Jeffrey, who said his knee is 100 percent. "Being able to make plays and protect the puck, those are the things I need to improve. I have to be better with the puck."

Jeffrey's defensive work has been solid, as evidenced by the fact that he entered Tuesday's game in Montreal at plus-1 despite producing limited offense.

"But I wouldn't say I'm satisfied," he said. "We need some secondary scoring. I have to be better."

> > Centers Sidney Crosby and Jordan Staal and defenseman Simon Despres skated for almost an hour at the Bell Centre on Tuesday. The trio took part in the team's optional morning skate, and then remained on the ice for nearly 30 minutes following the workout. Crosby, who spoke with the media Monday, will resume skating by himself starting this week. Staal could be back in the lineup as early as this weekend, though a return next might be a safer bet.

> > The Penguins still have not issued any information regarding the health of right winger Tyler Kennedy, who returned to Pittsburgh after being injured Sunday against New Jersey. Kennedy appeared to suffer a knee or leg injury. The team is expecting more information regarding Kennedy's status Wednesday.

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.