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Penguins don't appear rattled by losses

The Penguins couldn't be blamed for being rattled. After all, they've blown two-goal leads in four losses to the Flyers during the past 27 days.

Instead of making significant alterations to their system or their approach, the Penguins insist their game will resurface with old-fashioned hard work.

"I don't think we need to change a whole lot," Penguins captain Sidney Crosby said. "We're just making a few mistakes. Look at last night (Friday). We gave up two more goals when we were on the power play. You can't do that. Just little mistakes we need to clean up. We need to manage the puck better."

The Penguins insist that their frame of mind is fine despite what could easily be interpreted as two devastating losses. Defenseman Ben Lovejoy, who was guilty of a game-altering turnover in Game 2, admits to being upset.

But, like his team, Lovejoy said moving forward is all that can be done.

"I think that we have to get back to playing our style of hockey," Lovejoy said. "We've been successful all year long. We won 51 games this year. We didn't give up third period leads all year."

The Penguins, as Lovejoy pointed out, went 29-0-3 when leading through two periods during the regular season.

Turnovers such as the one Lovejoy committed in the third period need to be avoided.

Lovejoy has endured a tough time trying to forget about the play.

"I wish it was that easy," Lovejoy said. "I wish I could have it back. I thought about it all night. I know that I have to play better."

Right wing James Neal says the team's psyche and system is fine.

Playing smarter hockey, he said, will go a long way.

"No one ever said it would be easy," he said. "It was a tough way for us to start the series. These past couple of games have been tough. But we've just got to go to Philly, stop being reckless with the puck and play our best hockey. It isn't supposed to be easy."

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