Share This Page

Pirates no longer in running for Ohka

The Pirates, still searching for a right-handed starter to add to the starting rotation, are out of the running for free-agent pitcher Tomo Ohka.

The Pirates made a two-year contract offer to Ohka. However, Ohka's agent, Monday, said the two sides had drifted apart over the past few days.

"Tomo won't be signing with the Pirates," Jim Masteralexis said. "The Pirates' interest cooled and our interests went in another direction."

Ohka, who went 4-5 with a 4.82 ERA last season for the Milwaukee Brewers, originally wanted a long-term contract but has changed his strategy. Now, he wants to sign a one-year deal and test free agency again next year.

"That opened doors with some other teams," Masteralexis said.

Ohka is mulling offers from the Washington Nationals and Toronto Blue Jays. The New York Mets also are in the mix.

A handful of free-agent pitchers are still on the market, including Jamey Wright, Jeff Weaver, Steve Trachsel, Chan Ho Park and Rick Helling.

If the Pirates fail to make a move, Shawn Chacon would be the frontrunner for the No. 5 spot in the rotation. Friday, Chacon avoided arbitration by agreeing to a one-year, $3.825 million contract with the Pirates.

Over the weekend, the Pirates were rebuffed by right-hander Brian Lawrence. Lawrence, who sat out last season after shoulder surgery, agreed to a one-year contract with the Colorado Rockies.

Ohka also is damaged goods. A rotator cuff injury which did not require surgery put him on the shelf from May 2 until July 17. He also sat out two weeks with sore hamstring.

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.