Share This Page

Talbot turns momentum for Penguins

Penguins center Max Talbot joked Saturday after his club's playoff series-clinching 5-3 victory against the Philadelphia Flyers at Wachovia Center that he was not sure he'd live to see his two-year contract extension, signed early in the regular season.

"I played with him in the minors; I know he's a tough cookie," Talbot said of his second-period fight with former Penguins prospect and Flyers left wing Daniel Carcillo.

Talbot ended up with a black eye to show for his effort — but that exchange of fists was praised by several Penguins players for sparking a rally from a three-goal deficit.

"It's no little thing," right wing Bill Guerin said. "It's a big thing."

Added captain Sidney Crosby: "Anytime a guy puts himself on the line like that, you want to follow that up."

Talbot admitted guilt played a role in his decision to engage Carcillo. His defensive-zone turnover was converted by the Flyers into a late first-period goal and a 1-0 deficit for the Penguins.

That deficit became 3-0 at 4:06 of the second period on Flyers center Danny Briere's power-play goal. Talbot fought Carcillo 15 seconds later.

"I felt responsible for that first goal, and I knew I was not going to score three goals after that, so I had to do something to make up for it and help my team," Talbot said. "I thought a fight could be something."

The Penguins scored three goals in a span of 12 minutes and 38 seconds after Talbot's fight with Carcillo, including their first — a crease-crashing tally by left wing Ruslan Fedotenko at 4:35.

"It was one of those moments where (we were like), 'Whoa, what just happened?'" Briere said. "All of a sudden it gave them life."

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.