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Championship rings draw raves from Pens

The Penguins have a long history of showcasing some of the most flashy players in NHL history.

Now, they can showcase some flashy jewelry.

Penguins players and officials gathered Tuesday in a private ceremony at The LeMont restaurant on Mt. Washington.

The players showed off the enormous rings, expressing disbelief at how impressive they are. Each one is loaded with 167 diamonds, the player's name, an image of the Stanley Cup and the Penguins' logo.

"It's very impressive," captain Sidney Crosby said. "I probably won't wear it too often, but it's great."

The players were awarded the rings in numerical order, which forced superstars Crosby and Evgeni Malkin to wait until everyone else had received one.

"That drove me nuts," Crosby said. "But it was worth it."

Bill Guerin, who won a Stanley Cup with the New Jersey Devils in 1995, said there is no comparison between the rings.

"In today's day and age, size matters," he said. "Back then was a different time, a different era."

The gathering marked the final celebration in what has been a whirlwind offseason for the Penguins.

Although the players were thrilled with the ceremony, they are ready for the season to begin.

"Now it's time to get down to business," Guerin said.

Those who were members of last season's team but have moved on will receive their rings later this season.

Team owners Mario Lemieux and Ron Burkle and GM Ray Shero presented the players with the rings. Those three, along with coach Dan Bylsma, played a role in the ring design.

"It was like everything else since I have been here," Guerin said. "It was first class all the way."

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