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Women accuse coach of violent behavior

The former wife of Oakland Raiders coach Tom Cable and a recent girlfriend claim Cable has a history of violent behavior toward women, and asked that he seek help for his anger.

Sandy Cable and Marie Lutz said in separate interviews on ESPN's "Outside the Lines" that the first-year head coach physically abused them at various times during their relationships.

Cable's attorney, Donald Yee, said in a statement Sunday that ESPN refused to provide details about the story when the network asked for comment. Yee also questioned the network's motives after waiting until Friday to contact the coach. ESPN spokesman Josh Krulewitz said the network stands by its story.

· Cleveland Browns running back Jamal Lewis plans to retire at the end of the season. Lewis told reporters after the Browns' 30-6 loss at Chicago that his 10th season will be his final one. Lewis has rushed for 10,456 yards in his career, and helped Baltimore win the Super Bowl as a rookie during his seven seasons with the Ravens.

· Ten years to the day he died, Walter Payton was honored by the Chicago Bears with a ceremony at halftime of Sunday's game against the Cleveland Browns. The crowd roared during a video tribute that showed highlights of his career and included praise from Mike Ditka and owner Virginia McCaskey, along with former teammates such as Otis Wilson and Richard Dent.

· Vikings quarterback Brett Favre threw four touchdown passes for the 21st time in his career during Minnesota's 38-26 victory over Green Bay and tied Dan Marino's NFL record.

· Buffalo Bills rookie safety Jairus Byrd joined San Francisco's Dave Baker as only the second NFL player to have two or more interceptions in three straight games. Baker accomplished the feat in 1960.

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