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Big Ben's accuser quits job

RENO, Nev. -- The woman who filed a lawsuit accusing Steelers quarterback Ben Roethlisberger of raping her has quit her job at the Lake Tahoe hotel-casino where she claims the assault occurred in the NFL star's penthouse room more than a year ago.

The woman had been working as a VIP host at Harrah's Lake Tahoe in July 2008, when she alleges the two-time Super Bowl champ lured her to his room under false pretenses and forced himself on her. He was in town playing in a celebrity golf tournament.

Her lawyer, Cal Dunlap, said Friday she quit "because of the way Harrah's was treating her."

He told The Associated Press he can't go into detail.

Dunlap said the woman took several leaves of absence for medical reasons in the months after the alleged incident, but she returned to work in March and had been there since.

Harrah's officials did not immediately return a telephone call or e-mail seeking comment.

The woman filed the suit in Washoe District Court in Reno last July.

Roethlisberger's lawyers asked the state Supreme Court to overturn a ruling by a district judge denying their motion to move the trial to Douglas County, closer to Lake Tahoe. No hearing has been set for that request.

Last month, Judge Brent Adams also denied a motion to dismiss the suit. It seeks a minimum of $440,000 in damages from Roethlisberger and at least $50,000 in damages from Harrah's officials who the woman claims conspired to cover up the incident.

Roethlisberger has denied the allegations and maintains the woman acted voluntarily at all times while in his room.

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