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Broncos sign veteran defensive back Law

ENGLEWOOD, Colo. — Ty Law spent the first half of the season waiting for the right team to come calling. Now that it has, he doesn't want to waste any more time getting back on the field.

Law, an Aliquippa graduate, came out of what he called "semiretirement" Saturday to join the Denver Broncos and counts on contributing Monday night when the Steelers bring three wide receivers to Invesco Field who are averaging more than 14 yards per catch.

"They're trying to get me ready to play this week in a limited fashion," Law said. "I did it last year."

The 15-year veteran joined the Jets at midseason in 2008 and played aplenty a few days later against New England.

"I'm just going to kind of wing it and go out and do the best I can," Law said. "But right now they're just shoving a lot down my throat because the terminology is totally different."

The 35-year-old Law gives the Broncos five players in the defensive backfield who are older than 30. Law said it was comforting to join a seasoned secondary that features Champ Bailey, Andre' Goodman, Renaldo Hill and Brian Dawkins.

"It's different between walking into a situation where you've got a bunch of young guys, a bunch of first- and second-year guys. This is perfect. I can take my time and learn the system because it's already established and all I'm doing is trying to help," Law said.

The five-time Pro Bowl cornerback passed his physical and practiced with the Broncos yesterday, trying to acclimate himself to the altitude after signing what was believed to be a one-year deal.

Law, who gives the Broncos a defensive backfield that now sports a combined 20 Pro Bowl selections, also is familiar with Denver coach Josh McDaniels, who was an assistant with the Patriots during his time in New England.

To make room on the roster, the Broncos waived defensive back Jack Williams. Law's signing also likely means reduced playing time in the nickel and dime packages for rookie Alphonso Smith.

Fox NFL pregame show in Afghanistan

The Fox NFL pregame show will be broadcast from a military installation in Afghanistan today.

The six-man announcing team traveled to an undisclosed location in the country this week to honor servicemen and women three days before Veterans Day. The two-hour special begins at 11 a.m.

"It's been so surreal, it's hard to describe," Fox analyst Michael Strahan said of the trip. "To witness so many young, smart, committed and capable men and women is inspiring. We're here to show our appreciation for their service and sacrifice, and all they want to do is show their appreciation to us for coming here."

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