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Bengals lose receiver Henry to broken arm

Cincinnati Bengals receiver Chris Henry wasn't sure whether he'd play again this season after he broke his arm during a 17-7 victory over the Baltimore Ravens on Sunday.

Henry broke his left forearm just above the wrist when he was tackled by cornerback Fabian Washington after a 10-yard reception. Henry's back hit the ground, and Washington landed on top of him.

• Washington Redskins running back Clinton Portis was sidelined in yesterday's game after taking a blow to the head from Atlanta Falcons safety Thomas DeCoud. Portis left the game with 3:20 remaining in the first quarter after a helmet-to-helmet hit from DeCoud. The Redskins said Portis suffered a head injury and would not return.

• Redskins cornerback DeAngelo Hall says Atlanta coach Mike Smith cursed at him and a Falcons assistant tried to "get some licks in" during a sideline melee yesterday. Hall said he plans to file a complaint with NFL commissioner Roger Goodell that Smith "cussed me out" and Falcons director of athletic performance Jeff Fish and others "put their hands on me."

• Indianapolis quarterback Peyton Manning threw 25 passes in the first quarter — the most in an opening quarter since 1991 — in the Colts' 20-17 victory over the Houston Texans. Manning also had the previous high mark (22) in 2004 against Green Bay. Manning also became the first NFL quarterback to throw for 40,000 yards in one decade.

• Jacksonville wide receiver Torry Holt became the 10th player in NFL history with 900 receptions in the Jaguars' 24-21 win over Kansas City. Holt had four catches for 37 yards yesterday.

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