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Steelers' title win secures home for Westwood woman

Like any Steelers fan, Debra Miller knew lots was at stake in this year's Super Bowl.

But she did not know exactly how much was at stake for her when two Florida Habitat For Humanity organizations — in honor of the 2009 Super Bowl being held in Tampa — decided to fund construction of a home for a resident in the winning team's city.

Ten months after the Super Bowl and six month after construction started on her home, Miller received keys on Saturday.

"What can I say• It's beautiful," said Debra Miller, 48.

The three-bedroom home in Westwood will house Miller and her three grandsons, ages 5 through 12.

She had applied to be considered for a home through the organization and met eligibility requirements, including willingness to work on the project. She got the Super Bowl home because she was next in line for a Habitat home, said Maggie Withrow, executive director of Habitat for Humanity of Greater Pittsburgh.

The home is one of nine Habitat homes to be built on Chessland Street. Four have been completed.

The land for the nine homes was donated by the Jendoco Construction Corp.

"It's the largest land donation we have ever had here. It's a great gift," said Derek Morris, the organization's volunteer coordinator.

Next year, the organization plans to build four homes next year in the Hill District.

Several Steelers players helped kick off construction at the Westwood home on June 8 and more than 100 people volunteered working on the house.

Miller will pay a mortgage of $482 per month for 30 years.

Since it was founded in 1976, Habitat For Humanity has built 300,000 homes. In the Pittsburgh area, the group has built 66 homes since 1986.

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