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Steelers join soldiers for video-game competition

Tammie Miller couldn't believe it when she saw her son Devin on the Internet while he was stationed overseas.

"It's wonderful,'' said Miller, of Uniontown, who was joined by her husband, Perry, recently retired after 26 years in the Army, and younger son, Brent.

Devin was among several soldiers from the U.S. Army's 336th Military Police Company stationed at Camp Sather AB USO in Iraq that participated in Friday's live video game competition with selected Steelers players at the team's South Side facility.

Players who participated included quarterback Ben Roethlisberger, wide receiver Hines Ward and offensive linemen Willie Colon, Trai Essex and Darnell Stapleton.

The Steelers and the soldiers competed on the Guitar Hero video game, which features participants playing instruments and singing popular tunes. Colon was the lead singer, accompainied by Roethlisberger on lead guitar, Essex on drums and Stapleton on bass. Ward later joined his teammates on guitar.

"Does everybody like Willie's singing?'' Roethlisberger asked.

The family members of several soldiers stationed in Iraq were able to connect through Pro vs. GI Joe, a non-profit organization that sets up real-time video game competitions via the Internet, using PlayStation, Xbox Live and/or the Nintendo Wii.

• Safety Troy Polamalu (knee injury) did not practice Friday and is unlikely to play in Sunday's 1 p.m. game against the Chiefs. Tyrone Carter is set to start in his place.

• DE Travis Kirschke is likely out against the Chiefs. Nick Eason is expected to make his third consecutive start at left defensive end.

• FB Carey Davis, who missed last week's game because of a hamstring injury, practiced all week and is expected to return to action.

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