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Pittsburgh natives proud of win over Steelers

KANSAS CITY — Chiefs offensive line coach Bill Muir, who was born in Pittsburgh, gave a special thanks to coach Todd Haley after the game.

"He said, 'In 32 years in the NFL, I've never beaten the Steelers,' " Haley said. "That's from a Western Pa. guy who's been wanting to beat the Steelers for a long time. It's a nice win for all of us."

Actually, one of Muir's teams did beat the Steelers more than a quarter-century ago. In 1983, New England won, 28-23, at Three Rivers Stadium when Muir was an offensive line coach for the Patriots. He was 1-8 against the Steelers until Sunday.

· If you thought Chiefs linebacker Andy Studebaker's 94-yard interception return from the Kansas City end zone to the Steelers' 8-yard line looked a bit familiar, you weren't the only one. Chiefs coach Todd Haley was the Cardinals offensive coordinator during James Harrison's record-breaking interception return in Super Bowl XLIII.

"I wish Studebaker would have scored on the interception," Haley said. "That would have been full retribution."

· Three weeks after getting cut by the Chargers, wide receiver Chris Chambers caught four passes for 119 yards, with a 47-yarder during San Diego's game-tying drive in the fourth quarter and a 61-yarder to set up the game-winning field goal in overtime. It was Chambers' most productive regular-season game since Dec. 3, 2006, when he was playing for the Miami Dolphins.

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