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Steelers find way to give back to police

Wearing a red Santa hat and his trademark grin, Steelers wide receiver Hines Ward brought a bag full of GPS units to the Pittsburgh police Highland Park station Tuesday morning.

Ward and six other players presented the 28 navigational units to the Zone 5 station, which lost three officers in a shooting this year.

"We want to give back to the community and give the police officers something to smile about, because it's been a rough year for them," Ward said.

With him were Charlie Batch, James Farrior, Keyaron Fox, Ramon Foster, Dennis Dixon and Andre Frazier.

Each of the players donated money to help buy the units, said Jack Kearney, Allegheny County Sheriff's lieutenant and chief of security for the Steelers. Ward sponsored a June softball tournament to raise additional money to cover the more than $3,000 cost, Kearney said.

"This will help our officers, because even if you work in the same zone for years, you might not know the name of every little street and alley, and this will help them get to scenes faster," Chief Nate Harper said.

Relatives of Officers Eric G. Kelly, Stephen J. Mayhle and Paul J. Sciullo II were present for the donation. The three were killed responding to a domestic disturbance in Stanton Heights on April 4.

"God bless them for doing this for these officers," said Sciullo's mother, Sue. Mayhle's wife, Shandra, and Kelly's wife, Marena, also were at the ceremony.

"This is an honor for us to do this," Ward said. "It's a very small token of our appreciation."

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